There are no problems -Only solutions

Planning your project

At Felagi we take design and planning very seriously. They say planning is 1/3 of the job and its not far from the truth. Identifying your needs for software solutions is very important and we will work directly with you and your organisation. It helps us, but is not a necessity to have your own software solutions experts in-house. Anyhow, we always keep this part on a level that "normal" people can understand. Felagi 's strategy is to keep long and good relations with our customers and have nothing to gain on overselling customer's need for solutions, hence good planning and analysis is important to identify real needs.

What do you have already?

Preliminary system study is the first stage of system development life cycle. This is a brief investigation of the system under consideration and gives a clear picture of what the physical system is?

We ask the Questions

What is the business problem or opportunity to be addressed

If there is an existing system in place. Where does it fall short? What are its strengths

What benefits would a new business system bring and what procedural improvements might occur

Are there other systems on campus that might performing similar functions or processing similar data

Is it possible to salvage parts of an old system?

What are the critical success factors for the departments business? How does the proposed system relate to these factors?

What do you want to have?

We work for you with you!

At Felagi we always make use of all our customers competance when planning! By working together with your own resources whom knows the business workflows best, we will get the best result!

Workshops for specifying changes and additions

Workshops together with key personnel always gives good results. The combination of all good ideas and technical knowledge gives exiting new ways of thinking solutions for your organizational software

What do you really need?

Based on our preliminary study we can identify if there is any "out of box" systems you can use to solve your needs and if this will be a more cost efficient
solution for you

If developing a bespoke system is the best for you, we ask these questions:

What is the business problem or opportunity to be addressed?

If there is an existing system in place, where does it fall short? What are its strengths?

What benefits would a new business system bring and what procedural improvements might occur?

Are there other systems on organization that may be performing similar functions or processing similar data?

Is it possible to salvage parts of an old system?

What are the critical success factors for the business? How does the proposed system relate to these factors?

Who will be the primary users?

Who are the business experts and who will define the business rules?

What departments and external entities will be impacted by the proposed system?

Who will provide final technical and operational approval for implementation of the system?

The system proposal is prepared by the System Analyst team (who studies the system) and places it before the business management in your organisation.

We write a human understandable document describing what you should be expected of the functionality and outcome of a new made system. This document will be our most important guideline for entering the next phase of the project cycle. It will be the key for any QA resources later together with the outcome of our analysis process

The SRS has several parts:

Purpose

Scope

Functionality

Usability

Reliability

Performance

Supportability

Design Constraints

Interfaces

Licensing Requirements

Legal, Copyright, and Other Notices

Applicable Standards

The detailed investigation of the existing system is carried out in accordance with the objectives of the proposed system. This involves detailed study of various operations performed by a system and their relationships within and outside the system. During this process, data are collected on the available files, decision points and transactions handled by the present system. Interviews, on-site observation and questionnaire are the tools used for detailed system study. Using the following steps. It becomes easy to draw the exact boundary of the new system under consideration

Keeping in veiw the problems and new requirements

Workout the pros and cons including new areas of the system

Keeping in view the problems and new requirements

Workout the pros and cons including new areas of the system